Last edited by Mazulkis
Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

5 edition of Genomic Imprinting and Kinship (The Rutgers Series in Human Evolution, edited by Robert Trivers, Lee Cronk, Helen Fisher, and Lionel Tiger) found in the catalog.

Genomic Imprinting and Kinship (The Rutgers Series in Human Evolution, edited by Robert Trivers, Lee Cronk, Helen Fisher, and Lionel Tiger)

David Haig

Genomic Imprinting and Kinship (The Rutgers Series in Human Evolution, edited by Robert Trivers, Lee Cronk, Helen Fisher, and Lionel Tiger)

by David Haig

  • 206 Want to read
  • 0 Currently reading

Published by Rutgers University Press .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Genetics (non-medical),
  • Kinship,
  • Life Sciences - Genetics & Genomics,
  • Genetic Code,
  • Human Evolution,
  • Science,
  • Sociology - Marriage & Family,
  • Science/Mathematics,
  • Mammals,
  • General,
  • Anthropology - Physical,
  • Genomic imprinting

  • The Physical Object
    FormatHardcover
    Number of Pages218
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL8025805M
    ISBN 100813530261
    ISBN 109780813530260

    Genomic imprinting occurs on small, specific regions of different chromosomes. It can be maintained through DNA replication and cell division. We .   Do you know how many review articles on genomic imprinting appeared during the last 12 months? Medline lists In the midst of such largesse, a new collection of reviews needs something extra to Author: Frank Sleutels, Denise P. Barlow.

      (An eBook reader can be a software application for use on a computer such as Microsoft's free Reader application, or a book-sized computer that is used solely as a reading device such as Nuvomedia's Rocket eBook.) Users can purchase an eBook on diskette or CD, but the most popular method of getting an eBook is to purchase a downloadable file of. Kinship and Genomic Imprinting. Robert Trivers, Austin Burt. Pages This book provides an unrivalled in-depth treatise of genomic imprinting, a phenomenon which plays a vital role in many biological processes in developmental biology, evolution and human diseases and genetics.

    Box 1. Theories for the evolution of genomic imprinting The initial description of genomic imprinting attracted numerous evolutionary theories ([69] for review). Traditionally, any theory based on an explanation other than an intragenomic conflict over maternal resources was viewed as being in conflict with the kinship theory [12,13,70].   Buy Genomic Imprinting and Kinship by David Haig from Waterstones today! Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £Author: David Haig.


Share this book
You might also like
Iowa, the great hunting ground of the Indian, and the beautiful land of the white man

Iowa, the great hunting ground of the Indian, and the beautiful land of the white man

The nineteene propositions cleered and the practice thereof desired

The nineteene propositions cleered and the practice thereof desired

Unwarranted delays by the Department of Transportation to improve light truck safety

Unwarranted delays by the Department of Transportation to improve light truck safety

Night She Died, The

Night She Died, The

Twelve ingenious characters, or, Pleasant descriptions of the properties of sundry persons & things

Twelve ingenious characters, or, Pleasant descriptions of the properties of sundry persons & things

Scoundrel time

Scoundrel time

He made them twain

He made them twain

Happiness at work

Happiness at work

GUERRA HISPANO-MARROQUI

GUERRA HISPANO-MARROQUI

Functional analysis

Functional analysis

Further studies on the systematics of Ctenizid trapdoor spiders

Further studies on the systematics of Ctenizid trapdoor spiders

Our Chemical Environment

Our Chemical Environment

Floreana

Floreana

The women of Primrose Creek

The women of Primrose Creek

Genomic Imprinting and Kinship (The Rutgers Series in Human Evolution, edited by Robert Trivers, Lee Cronk, Helen Fisher, and Lionel Tiger) by David Haig Download PDF EPUB FB2

Genomic Imprinting and Kinship book. Read reviews from world’s largest community for readers. Until twenty years ago we had no idea which of our genes ca 3/5. Genomic Imprinting and Kinship (The Rutgers Series in Human Evolution, edited by Robert Trivers, Lee Cronk, Helen Fisher, and Lionel Tiger) Paperback – Febru by David Haig (Author) › Visit Amazon's David Haig Page.

Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Cited by: Genomic Imprinting and Kinship (Rutgers Series on Human Evolution) - Kindle edition by Haig, David. Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Genomic Imprinting and Kinship (Rutgers Series on Human Evolution).5/5(1).

Genomic imprinting and kinship. [David Haig] Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: David Haig. Find more information about: ISBN: X Parent-Specific Gene Expression vs. Imprinting --Genomic Imprinting in Endosperm.

Genomic Imprinting and Kinship by David Haig,available at Book Depository with free delivery worldwide.3/5(3). The kinship theory of genomic imprinting proposes that parent-specific gene expression evolves at a locus because a gene's level of expression in one individual has fitness effects on other individuals who have different probabilities of carrying the maternal and paternal alleles of the individual in which the gene is expressed.

Therefore, natural selection favors different levels of Cited by: Genomic imprinting, process wherein a gene is differentially expressed depending on whether it has been inherited from the mother or from the father.

Such “parent-of-origin” effects are known to occur only in sexually reproducing placental mammals. Imprinting is one of a number of patterns of inheritance that do not obey the traditional Mendelian rules of inheritance, which assume. Haig D, Graham C () Genomic imprinting and the strange case of the insulin-like growth factor II receptor.

Cell – PubMed CrossRef Google Scholar Haig D, Trivers R () The evolution of parental imprinting: a review of by: 1.

Annu Rev Genet. ; Genomic imprinting and kinship: how good is the evidence. Haig D(1). Author information: (1)Department of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, MassachusettsUSA.

[email protected] The kinship theory of genomic imprinting proposes that parent-specific gene expression evolves at a locus Cited by: The Kinship Theory of Genomic Imprinting suggests that, in polyandrous (i.e.

females mate multiply) species, the reproductive interests of a father can be favoured if. Genomic imprinting and uniparental disomy are factors that influence how some genetic conditions are inherited.

Genomic imprinting. People inherit two copies of their genes—one from their mother and one from their father. Usually both copies of each gene are active, or “turned on,” in cells.

In some cases, however, only one of the two. The kinship theory of genomic imprinting argues that conflicting reproductive interests between males and females can lead to epigenetic modifications to the Author: David Haig.

Genomic Imprinting and the Evolutionary Psychology of Human Kinship. DAVID HAIG. Genomic imprinting is predicted to influence behaviors that affect individuals to whom an actor has different degrees of matrilineal and patrilineal kinship (asymmetric kin).

imprinted genes is the kinship theory of imprinting–38 According to this theory, imprinting is the result of an intragenomic conflict, where natural selection acts differently on maternally and paternally derived alleles at the. Buy Genomic Imprinting and Kinship by David Haig online at Alibris UK.

We have new and used copies available, in 2 editions - starting at $ Shop Range: $ - $ THE KINSHIP THEORY OF IMPRINTING Symmetric and Asymmetric Kin Descendants of the two alleles at a locus are potential competitors for future dom-ination of the gene pool.

Despite this divergence in long-term interests, the alleles have a common short-term interest in increasing the number of successful gametes produced by their shared individual. Amacher Lect 10/19/08 MCB C/IB C A model for imprinting at the Igf2 locus.

Insight into how imprinting at Igf2 might function came from the discovery that a linked gene, called H19, was imprinted in the opposite fashion (paternally, instead of maternally).One model (an “enhancer competition” model) is that the two linked genes, Igf2 and H19 share an File Size: KB.

Genomic Imprinting Genomic imprinting: a mark about parental origin Genomic imprinting is the biological process whereby a gene or genomic domain is biochemically marked with information about its parental origin.

Genomic imprints may be covalent (DNA methylation) or non-covalent (DNA-protein and DNA-RNA interactions, genomic localization in. Imprinting means that that gene is silenced, and gene from other parent is expressed. The mechanisms for imprinting are still incompletely defined, but they involve epigenetic modifications that are erased and then reset during the creation of eggs and sperm.

Genomic imprinting is a process of silencing genes through DNA methylation. genomic imprinting [DAVID HAIG: ]My work over the last decade or so has been principally concerned with conflicts within the individual organism. In a lot of evolutionary biology, the implicit metaphor is that the organism is a machine or, more specifically, a fitness-maximizing computer trying to solve some problem.

Parent-specific gene expression (genomic imprinting) is an evolutionary puzzle because it forgoes an important advantage of diploidy — protection against the effects of deleterious recessive.Genomic Imprinting. Genomic or parental imprinting is a process involving acquisition of a closed chromatin state and DNA hypermethylation in one allele of a gene (e.g., a growth suppressor gene) early in the male and female germline that leads to monoallelic expression.Demography, kinship, and the evolving theory of genomic imprinting.

concrete predictions about the imprinting status of specific genes based on the fitness effects of those genes and the demography, ecology, and life history of the species in question.

In the next section we provide some examples of such predictions and suggest how they Cited by: